Articles

Articles

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  • Talk to my Face, Not to my Breasts: The Experience of Women in STEM

    As a female scientist in a male-dominated field, I often have difficulty navigating my way through the mire of communication with male faculty. As a woman of color, entering into the predominately white male academic world is intimidating enough, but add on the layer of stress of having to deal with unwanted sexual advances and work life […]

  • Mental Health Series: It Is Hard To See Success When I Can’t Think Like Everyone Else

    In response to Nadia Perez’s blog post, I feel motivated to write about my own ambivalence regarding science and my current opportunities to pursue a Ph.D. Like her, research became my safety net. I finally found something to make me feel good about myself after a lifetime of feeling inferior to everyone else around me. […]

  • The Controversy Behind Who to Include in the ‘URM in STEM’ Category

    Efforts to increase underrepresented minority (URM) representation in STEM has been gaining traction as of late, with many large institutions are putting forth initiatives and funds to help diversify the STEM workforce. The latest statistics from the National Science Foundation indicate that up to 70% of the STEM workforce is comprised of whites, a number […]

  • The Unacknowledged Burden of Providing Food for Lab Meeting

    Finances for graduate students are a common source of serious stress. In addition, many first-generation students or underrepresented minorities use a good chunk of their monthly stipends supporting a family and are left with the bare minimum needed to live until the next check comes. Our contributors have voiced their struggles and interactions with unsympathetic […]

  • Navigating The Overlooked Abuse Culture in STEM as a Person of Color

    As a kid, I thought of scientists as almost mythical creatures, far removed from reality. Scientists weren’t just regular people; they were geniuses who descended upon the world to bless us with their intelligence. And to top it all off, all scientists looked like Albert Einstein, a classic archetype of an old white guy with […]

  • The Complexity of Guilt When You are a First Generation Graduate Student and Mom

    After reading, my husband’s piece on his guilt from familial obligations while pursuing his Ph.D., I was reminded of my own guilt. I definitely have the guilt of not being able to help my mother out financially. Watching her struggle hurts me to my core because I can’t do anything but lend an ear or offer […]

  • As a Gay Latino, Stereotype Threat Almost Destroyed Me

    Written by Luis Valencia Whenever I am asked about academia, research, or science, I find myself anchored to a time before I even knew what these words meant. I recall a time in which these three words could not be used interchangeably. Academia was simply going to classes. Research meant a paper I had to […]

  • The guilt in pursuing a Ph.D.: The familial obligations of first-generation people of color

    My parents, like the parents of other first-generation U.S. citizens, invested their lives into my education. In many ways, the decision to go to pursue a Ph.D. instead of something more practical, like becoming an MD, seems incredibly selfish.

Spotlights
  • The Controversy Behind Who to Include in the ‘URM in STEM’ Category

    Efforts to increase underrepresented minority (URM) representation in STEM has been gaining traction as of late, with many large institutions are putting forth initiatives and funds to help diversify the STEM workforce. The latest statistics from the National Science Foundation indicate that up to 70% of the STEM workforce is comprised of whites, a number […]

  • Spotlight in History: Mario Molina, Chemist and Nobel Prize Awardee

    The scientists I looked up to at the beginning were not Latino. They were famous scientists of many years ago, like Madame Curie. Later, I realized that there were also, but a very few, Latino scientists. There were good ones, but very few, because there wasn’t as much a tradition to be a scientist in […]

  • Spotlight: Theresa Nyabeze, Mining Engineer

    Theresa Nyabeze decided that she wanted to help increase diversity in STEM fields by sharing her slightly unconventional career as a mining engineer. Moving to Canada from Zimbabwe when she was 12, Theresa joined an all-girls school. Without mentors to inform her of her options, she felt going into Medicine was the only option when you […]

  • Spotlight in History: Ellen Ochoa, Astronaut & Inventor

    Usually, girls weren’t encouraged to go to college and major in math and science. My high school calculus teacher, Ms. Paz Jensen, made math appealing and motivated me to continue studying it in college. -Ellen Ochoa Ellen Ochoa was born in Los Angeles, CA in 1958. Her parents Joseph Ochoa and Roseanne Deardorff met in […]

  • Spotlight in History: James West, Physicist & Inventor

    “My hobby is my work. I have the best of both worlds because I love what I do. Do I ever get tired of it? Not so far.” –James West James West was born in Prince Edward County, Virginia in 1931. In his youth, he tinkered with appliances, he said, “If I had a screwdriver […]

  • Spotlight in History: Patricia Bath, Ophthalmologist & Inventor

    Believe in the power of truth… Do not allow your mind to be imprisoned by majority thinking. Remember that the limits of science are not the limits of imagination. -Dr. Patricia E. Bath Patricia Bath was born in Harlem, New York in 1942. Her father, Rupert Bath, was the first black motorman for the New […]

  • Outreach Spotlight: Kids First Initiative

    “Always Putting Kids First” essentially sums up their mission but those four words have a great impact on the community.

Science in the Media
  • On Dr. Ben Carson and the Paucity of Choice

    I want to look across the scientific landscape and the media as a whole, to see faces like mine looking back at me.

  • Recent Advances in Cervical Cancer Research

    Cervical cancer has been getting much more attention as of late partly due to the HBO adaptation of Rebecca Skloot’s book “The Immortal life of Henrietta Lacks”. As a survivor of the same type of cancer that took Henrietta’s life and led to the development of the HeLa cell line, Skloot’s book resonated heavily with […]

  • HeLa Cells: A Stolen Savior

    HeLa cells are derived from a cancerous cervical lesion that Henrietta Lacks was having treated at Johns Hopkins Hospital. During a routine examination, George Gey, a researcher, took Henrietta’s cells, sadly without her knowledge or consent.

  • Review of HBO’s Adaptation of ‘The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks’

    When I heard that HBO was working on an adaptation of Rebecca Skloot’s “The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks,” my excitement knew no bounds. Despite my excitement, I was skeptical. Anyone that knows me will tell you that I am skeptical about almost everything. But, my reservations died down when I discovered Oprah would be […]

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